Doctors that treat low testosterone

This review considers whether probiotics are effective agents for the treatment and/or prevention of bacterial vaginosis (BV). There seems to be an association between the absence of, or low concentrations of, vaginal lactobacilli and the development of BV. Many studies have suggested that the presence of H2O2-producing vaginal lactobacilli may protect against BV, although some studies do not support this hypothesis. In-vitro studies have suggested that certain specific strains of lactobacilli are able to inhibit the adherence of Gardnerella vaginalis to the vaginal epithelium and/or produce H2O2, lactic acid and/or bacteriocins, which inhibit the growth of bacteria causing BV. Clinical trials showed that intra-vaginal administration of Lactobacillus acidophilus for 6-12 days, or oral administration of L. acidophilus or Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus fermentum RC-14 for 2 months, resulted in the cure of BV (defined as a 0-1 positive score according to Amsel's criteria), and/or reduced the recurrences of BV, and/or caused an increase in vaginal lactobacilli and restoration of a normal vaginal microbiota, significantly more frequently than did a placebo, acetic acid or no treatment. However, several trials have found no significant difference in the cure rate of BV and in the number of vaginal lactobacilli after intra-vaginal instillation of lactobacilli when compared with the effect of a placebo or oestrogen. Thus, although the available results concerning the effectiveness of the administration of lactobacilli for the treatment of BV are mostly positive, it cannot yet be concluded definitively that probiotics are useful for this purpose.

Some patients who have mild disease may not need immediate treatment, according to panels convened by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in 2002. Patients who are symptom-free, whose blood calcium is only slightly elevated, and whose kidneys and bones are normal may wish to talk with their physicians about long-term monitoring. In the 2002 recommendation, periodic monitoring would consist of clinical evaluation, measurement of serum calcium levels, and bone mass measurement. If the patient and physician choose long-term follow-up, the patient should try to drink lots of water, get plenty of exercise , and avoid certain diuretics, such as the thiazides . Immobilization (inability to move) and gastrointestinal illness with vomiting or diarrhea can cause calcium levels to rise. Patients with hyperparathyroidism should seek medical attention if they find themselves immobilized, vomiting, or having diarrhea .

While endorsing further research to address the many unanswered questions in the field, the authors recommend that only pediatric endocrinologists manage evaluation and treatment for growth hormone deficiency, ISS and PIGFD in children. "The rigorous methods were designed to create recommendations at the group level," Grimberg added. "However, due to inter-individual variability, it is important for clinicians to weigh the potential benefits and risks of treatment for each individual patient in the context of the evolving evidence base."

The information on this site is provided by physicians experienced in the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases with low dose antibiotics according to the protocol developed by the late Dr. Thomas McPherson Brown, . and by many of the multiple thousands of patients who have benefited from this treatment. The website includes all the information necessary to administer this therapy. Physicians should not attempt antibiotic therapy until they have read the protocol completely as this therapy is unlike any other they may be currently using. There are many components to these diseases and their treatment and antibiotic therapy must be tailored to the individual. Treatment periods are usually long and medication and dosage adjustments may be required.

Doctors that treat low testosterone

doctors that treat low testosterone

The information on this site is provided by physicians experienced in the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases with low dose antibiotics according to the protocol developed by the late Dr. Thomas McPherson Brown, . and by many of the multiple thousands of patients who have benefited from this treatment. The website includes all the information necessary to administer this therapy. Physicians should not attempt antibiotic therapy until they have read the protocol completely as this therapy is unlike any other they may be currently using. There are many components to these diseases and their treatment and antibiotic therapy must be tailored to the individual. Treatment periods are usually long and medication and dosage adjustments may be required.

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