Testostrone injections

I understand how you feel, I really do. I’ve spent so much time crying that I’m certain all my tears could have filled up an olympic size swimming pool by now. You must not give up hope, even when it seems there is none. It is so important. Without that I don’t know how I would get by. Once you say what city/state you are in, I really hope someone can recommend a good doctor. I think that is part of your despair, that you haven’t really been heard out by a physician and received the bloodwork you want and are entitled to.

Testosterone cypionate (Depo-Testosterone), testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl), testosterone undecanoate (Aveed), and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are forms of testosterone injection used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by certain medical conditions, including disorders of the testicles, pituitary gland, (a small gland in the brain), or hypothalamus (a part of the brain) that cause hypogonadism. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your testosterone levels to see if they are low before you begin to use testosterone injection. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may be used in certain women with a type of breast cancer called mammary cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Testosterone should not be used to treat the symptoms of low testosterone in men who have low testosterone due to aging ('age related hypogonadism'). Testosterone is in a class of medications called androgenic hormones. Testosterone is a hormone produced by the body that contributes to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection works by supplying synthetic testosterone to replace the testosterone that is normally produced naturally in the body. When used to treat breast cancer, testosterone works by stopping the release of estrogen.

I know this is an old post, but the bit about estrogen affecting fat distribution is very interesting to me. I’ve always stored fat in my middle, even as an otherwise-skinny tween. I’m very happy with my weight otherwise, but the disproportionate belly-bulge worries me health-wise (and vanity-wise, of course). I’ve always assumed this was either an annoying personal quirk or stress-related, but I never thought about it being a hormonal issue. Maybe I should get a hormone panel done. Have you found a good silver-bullet way to increase/balance estrogen, or is it just as incredibly complex as everything else in the human body? Let me guess… 😉

Hi Angie (and followers)
I’ve just taken a book out of the library called Testosterone- the Secret Female Hormone by Dr Kathy C Maupin of the USA; I’ve found much of the info very useful, although she pretty much only recommends testosterone pellet implants. I’m thinking of buying a copy and lending it to my GP!
I was prescribed testosterone for exhaustion/. in South Africa – via injection – and it hugely improved my energy levels, controlled my pain, improved my skin and mood, etc. Then I came over to the UK and found it was banned for use by women. Fortunately I’d brought a few ampoules with me, but the docs were very reluctant to inject it, until I told them that if they didn’t, I would find a syringe from a druggie and use that 🙂 I was referred to an endocrinologist who said he would prescribe Testogel for me but I’d have to work out the – minimal – dosage myself as he didn’t prescribe it for women usually. I’ve found that about 2 or 3 drops works for me; I don’t measure it too carefully, and on the days I use too big a blob, I feel much better! I’ve had no side effects that I know of : no voice deepening, no hair growth. But there’s a problem – last time I needed a repeat, I was told that it is no longer licensed because ‘one woman died of a heart attack while using it’. Well, I did think that perhaps she was going to have one anyway, and that it might help thousands of women but harm just a few, so now we all have to suffer because someone was unlucky. I managed to get my GP to prescribe it ‘privately’ which means I now have to pay for it at the pharmacy. I imagine this is the same for all testosterone for women, or do you know of any that’s still licensed for our use on NHS?

Please don’t apologies for the length. The more I know about your history the easier it is for me to give you feedback. I do believe that it is harder to conceive for many woman when they are trying for their second or third child. I believe that it is less about your age and more about how much your life has changed. Now that you have a child you are no longer priority #1, and if you are lucky you are #2. You may not sleep as well or eat as well. Stress may have increased because now you have someone else to care for. There are many factors that play a role in your decrease of antral follicles. I do think that CoQ10 or Ubiquinol is helpful for changing this number but you should not expect to see this change in a couple of months. This will take longer. More importantly I find that many patients who I treat for secondary fertility issues have underlying or subclinical thyroid issues. I would make sure to have a full thyroid panel completed (not just TSH).

Testostrone injections

testostrone injections

Hi Angie (and followers)
I’ve just taken a book out of the library called Testosterone- the Secret Female Hormone by Dr Kathy C Maupin of the USA; I’ve found much of the info very useful, although she pretty much only recommends testosterone pellet implants. I’m thinking of buying a copy and lending it to my GP!
I was prescribed testosterone for exhaustion/. in South Africa – via injection – and it hugely improved my energy levels, controlled my pain, improved my skin and mood, etc. Then I came over to the UK and found it was banned for use by women. Fortunately I’d brought a few ampoules with me, but the docs were very reluctant to inject it, until I told them that if they didn’t, I would find a syringe from a druggie and use that 🙂 I was referred to an endocrinologist who said he would prescribe Testogel for me but I’d have to work out the – minimal – dosage myself as he didn’t prescribe it for women usually. I’ve found that about 2 or 3 drops works for me; I don’t measure it too carefully, and on the days I use too big a blob, I feel much better! I’ve had no side effects that I know of : no voice deepening, no hair growth. But there’s a problem – last time I needed a repeat, I was told that it is no longer licensed because ‘one woman died of a heart attack while using it’. Well, I did think that perhaps she was going to have one anyway, and that it might help thousands of women but harm just a few, so now we all have to suffer because someone was unlucky. I managed to get my GP to prescribe it ‘privately’ which means I now have to pay for it at the pharmacy. I imagine this is the same for all testosterone for women, or do you know of any that’s still licensed for our use on NHS?

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